Travel Tales
Title
Pepe

FREE ADVICE
Browse Our Travel Ads
Receive Our Newsletter
Use Our Search Engine
Discover Hermail.Net
Advertise With Us
 
BEST SHE CAN BE
 
JUST FOR HER
Her Travel Tales
Her Cities of the World
She Travels Solo
She Loves to Cruise
The Older Adventuress
She Travels to Learn
Her EcoAdventures
She's a Biz Traveller
She Shops the World
She Travels with Kids
GirlTalk Cyberguides
 
THINGS SHE LOVES
Men Have Their Say
Travel Love Stories
Tour Guides Worldwide
Restaurants Worldwide
Books She Suggests
We Love Canada
 
HEALTH & WELLNESS
She Visits Spas
JourneyDoctor Advice
 
CONTACT US
Letter to the Editor
Send a travel tip
Media request
Speaking Engagements
Want to Advertise?

Travel Love Stories

Solo Travel Tips

News sample

JW Twitter

 

This Month's Hot Deals


A First Timer's Guide To Philadelphia

Compiled by Evelyn Hannon

While Philadelphia offers a variety of authentic and top-notch attractions, exploring this vibrant city takes some planning-especially for first-time Journey Women visitors. With so much to see, do and taste, it's challenging for a novice to know where to begin. From the historic Liberty Bell to the deliciously tempting South 9th Street Italian Market, here's a look at Philly 101.

Historical Hot Spots...

Independance Hall - While historical attractions abound in Philly, Independence Hall has particular significance to the development of the American Nation. In this building in 1776, the Founding Fathers came together to sign the Declaration of Independence. Eleven years later, representatives from a dozen states met here to lay the framework for the U.S. Constitution. Today, the building is the centerpiece of Independence National Historical Park, and guided tours are available to visitors year-round. Free, timed tickets are required and can be picked up at the Independence Visitor Center at 6th and Market Streets. Tours can sell out before noon, so visitors are encouraged to plan accordingly. 520 Chestnut Street, (215) 965-2305, nps.gov/inde

Liberty Bell - Moved to its current location across from Independence Hall in 2003, the bell that was later named the Liberty Bell was originally cast in Great Britain and recast in 1753 in Philadelphia to adorn the State House. Used to call the Pennsylvania Assembly to meetings, it was soon adopted by abolitionists, suffragists, Civil Rights advocates, Native Americans, immigrants, war protesters and others as their symbol. The 44-pound clapper caused the Bell's crack on its first use, and though it has been recast twice, the imperfection remains today. Visitors can tour the Liberty Bell Center year-round. 526 Market Street, (215) 965-2305, nps.gov/inde

Valley Forge - In the winter of 1777-1778, Valley Forge was the encampment headquarters of the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War. Today, a national park on this site honors the sacrifice and strength of those who helped secure freedom for the United States. Valley Forge National Historical Park offers a variety of programming throughout the year, including ranger programs, guided tours and living history demonstrations. 1400 N. Outer Line Drive, King of Prussia, (610) 783-1000, nps.gov/vafo


Signature Sites...

Boathouse Row - This National Historic Landmark consists of 10 charming boathouses that sit on the banks of the Schuylkill River. These structures have been associated with rowing since the 19th century, and the boat clubs that occupy them have produced many Olympic champions. At night, the glittering lights that frame the buildings on Boathouse Row make for idyllic scenery as they reflect off of the river's surface. #4 Kelly Drive, boathouserow.org

City Hall - Located at the intersection of Market and Broad Streets, City Hall has been Philadelphia's government headquarters for more than 100 years, and it's the largest municipal building in the country. For a bird's-eye view of the city, visitors head to the observation deck, which sits just below the 37' bronze statue of William Penn that tops the building's clock tower. The building is open to the public from Monday to Friday, and visitors can take either a four-person tower tour that leaves every 15 minutes between 9:30 a.m. and 4:15 p.m. or a 12:30 p.m. two-hour public tour that highlights the art, architecture, the tower and history of the building. Tickets are sold first come first served. Reservations can be made on the day of the tour. Broad & Market Streets, (215) 686-2840, phila.gov/virtualch

 

More...

 

 

 


Sick & alone on the road


25 + Ways to Enjoy Las Vegas


Home

 
     

free newsletter | gal-friendly city sites | go-alone travel tips | love stories
travel classifieds | ms. biz | journey doctor | women's travel tales | she goes shopping
what should I wear? | letters to the editor | the older adventuress | travel 101 | girl talk guides
women helping women travel | her spa stop | her ecoadventures | best books
travel with kiddies | shopping | cruise holidays | awards and kudos | home|
search engine

Contact Information